Reading, writing and dental exams New center to bring health care inside S.L. school

SALT LAKE CITY — In two years, Lincoln Elementary School students and their families will be able to get free dental, vision and preventive health care during the school day.

That’s the hope of education leaders and community organizations, who plan to build a new community learning center in a new school building at 1090 Roberta St. The plans were laid out Thursday along with the announcement of a donation from the Tye and Noorda Foundation that will contribute to the project.

Community learning centers combine basic health services from local providers with students’ regular school attendance in order to improve their ability to learn. This could include dental checkups, free glasses, and meals for students and their families, among other services. The Salt Lake City School District and the Salt Lake Education Foundation currently have several in operation.

“We’re seeing what’s possible when a community steps up and starts talking locally, not from the outside, about what are truly the needs to be able to break the cycle of poverty, what are the needs to address health issues for kids so they can become bright, capable learners in school,” said district Superintendent McKell Withers.

The new two-story building will

University of Utah students call for free tuition for all

ALT LAKE CITY — Protesters rallied and marched Thursday, calling for free tuition at public universities, cancellation of all student debt, and implementation of a $15 minimum hourly wage for university employees.

At highest attendance, about 65 people attended the Million Students March outside the University of Utah’s A. Ray Olpin Student Union Building.

“Education should not to be a debt sentence,” said Dennis Potter, an associate professor of philosophy at Utah Valley University.

The Institute for College Access and Success reports that the national average student debt was $28,950 for the class of 2014, and the The Associated Press has previously reported that student debt can negatively impact families for generations.

Socialist Alternative of the University of Utah, Utah Millennials 4 Bernie Sanders and Revolutionary Students’ Union were the primary organizers of the event.

Scott Wood, a Socialist Alternative leader, said the Million Student March is a national movement. Its website, studentmarch.org, boasts more than 110 events nationwide.

“I want attendees feel like they are not alone, that there are students out there who share their concerns,” Wood said. “These are ambitious demands, but these demands have been met in other places like Chile.”

Samuel Grenny, founder of Utah Millennials 4 Bernie

Bullying of student photographer during Missouri protest sparks outrage

Declaring the patch of University of Missouri campus where protestors were camping a “no-media safe space,” race protestors bullied a student photographer this week, sparking outrage in the news media and elsewhere.

Student photographer Tim Tai, on assignment for ESPN, was blocked from shooting photos and bullied, ironically, by a Mizzou communications faculty member, who, in a video of the incident, rallied other protestors to use “muscle” to “get this reporter out of here.”

In the video, Tai tries to explain to the increasingly hostile crowd that the media has every right to cover the protests that resulted in the resignation of the university president and chancellor over race tensions on campus. The two administrators only resigned after the school’s football team threatened not to play in solidarity with student and faculty claims of persistent on-campus racism, which protesters say university officials ignored.

In since-deleted tweets captured by the New York Times, the activist group leading the protests, ConcernedStudent1950, defended its actions by tweeting, “We truly appreciate having our story told, but this movement isn’t for you,” and “We ask for no media in the parameters so the place where people live, fellowship, & sleep can be protected from

How to Write a Catchy Essay Introduction?

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National test scores have fallen across the board

Much-anticipated national test scores released last week seem to show a country stagnating across the board in reading and math, with scores of almost every demographic group and region slipping since 2013.

Most experts agree that the new NAEP scores, derived from testing done last spring in 2015, present some difficulty for educational reformers who had become accustomed to touting progress in NAEP scores as evidence that new curriculum and accountability systems were paying dividends.

“We’ve gotten so used to NAEP scores going steadily up that these results are striking, and cause for concern,” said Rick Hess, a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

“Combined with last week’s testing reversal by the White House, this could lend momentum for those pushing back against Obama-era centerpieces like test-based teacher evaluation,” Hess said.

But hasty most experts also warn against conclusions based on a single test year. “We’re not sure whether it is a blip or a trend, or what to do about it,” said Michael Petrilli, president of the Washington D.C.-based Fordham Institute.

Petrilli notes that, though it is very tempting, it is wrong to draw too much out of a single testing year like this. “We’ll have to wait to 2017 to

Many toddlers have their own mobile device by age 4

A small survey of an impoverished Philadelphia neighborhood finds startling penetration by and reliance on tablets and smartphones for young children, with the vast majority of households having both tablets and smartphones in the home and most 4-year-olds owning their own mobile device by the age of 4.

The survey, conducted at a pediatric clinic in a low-income urban area, suggests good news and bad news. The good news is that the income-based technological gap is not nearly as large as often supposed. The bad news is that children are left unsupervised for long periods of time.

Because of its limited scope, the survey is meant to point to further research, rather than firm conclusions, but the results were quite surprising on every level.

“Parents gave children devices when doing house chores (70 percent), to keep them calm (65 percent) and at bedtime (29 percent). At age 2, most children used a device daily and spent comparable screen time on television and mobile devices. Most 3- and 4-year-olds used devices without help, and one-third engaged in media multitasking. Content delivery applications such as YouTube and Netflix were popular,” the study found.

Dr. Michael Rich, the director of the Center on Media and

Here’s some good news about the rising cost of college

An annual report on the cost of college released Wednesday indicated parents who help their high school seniors plan for college should always take tuition increases into account.

But the report’s findings weren’t all gloomy: In-state tuition and fees increases at public universities for the 2015-16 school year were the lowest they’ve been since the ’70s, Kevin Walker wrote for U.S. News & World Report.

That contradicts people’s views on the financial side of higher education, the report, published by the College Board, read.

“Significantly, and perhaps counter to public impressions, price increases are not accelerating over time,” Walker quoted the trends piece as stating.

Julia Glum wrote for International Business Times the costs were up about 3 percent across the board. The report showed tuition and fees for an in-state student at a public, four-year college averaged $9,410 — $265 more than last year.

“Public, four-year out-of-state schools cost $23,893 — up $786 from the year before — and private colleges cost $32,405 — about $1,000 more,” Glum’s report read.

The 2.9 percent increase for in-state tuition was about the same as the prior two years, Karla Bowsher wrote for Money Talks News. In addition, the average federal loan per undergraduate student fell 6 percent

State School Board moves toward new assessment for kindergartners

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah kindergartners might see a new entrance assessment to help teachers understand their academic readiness before starting school.

Utah does not have a consistent way of measuring the academic abilities of new kindergartners, but members of the Utah State Board of Education are considering adopting a standardized entrance test for kindergartners across the state. The test would replace exams that schools currently administer individually.

The assessment would also coincide with proposed legislation to extend full-day kindergarten to more low-income students and those who perform poorly on entrance exams.

The Standards and Assessment Committee on Thursday considered several possibilities for adopting a uniform kindergarten entrance assessment. The committee voted in favor of using DIBELS, a reading test already used in many Utah schools, unless another commercially developed test is found to be more promising.

That decision was approved by the full State School Board on Friday.

Education leaders hope to ultimately adopt an assessment that allows teachers to measure student performance throughout the year, rather than giving a single test at the beginning of the year.

Using a commercial product would also save time that would otherwise be spent on designing a new assessment, according to Rich Nye, associate superintendent at the Utah

GOP candidate Ben Carson backs off West Point scholarship claim

WASHINGTON — Republican White House hopeful Ben Carson was not offered a formal scholarship to the United States Military Academy at West Point as he wrote in his autobiography, his campaign said Friday.

Carson, a newcomer to national politics, has developed a passionate following based in part on an inspirational personal story and devotion to Christian values. The only African-American in the Republican 2016 class, Carson grew up in inner-city Detroit and often speaks about his brushes with violence and poverty during his early years.

His campaign on Friday sought to clarify a statement in his breakout book, “Gifted Hands,” in which he outlines his participation with the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, commonly known as ROTC, while in high school.

“I was offered a full scholarship to West Point,” Carson wrote in the 1996 book. “I didn’t refuse the scholarship outright, but I let them know that a military career wasn’t where I saw myself going. As overjoyed as I felt to be offered such a scholarship, I wasn’t really tempted.”

Campaign spokesman Doug Watts said Carson was “the top ROTC student in the city of Detroit” and “was introduced to folks from West Point by his ROTC supervisors.”

“They told him they could help

Teen discovers his real identity when applying to college

VESTAVIA HILLS, Ala. — An Ohio teenager applying to college discovered some startling things about himself because of a discrepancy involving his Social Security number: His real name. And that he was allegedly snatched from his mother in Alabama by his father when he was 5.

Father and son were discovered living under assumed names this week in Cleveland, where by all accounts 18-year-old Julian Hernandez was an excellent student and had been well cared for. The father, Bobby Hernandez, 53, was arrested and faces charges that could send him to prison for a decade or more.

Authorities are still trying to piece together what happened to the boy over the 13 years he was missing. But some of the bare facts are known: He vanished from his mother’s home in the Birmingham area in 2002, his father leaving a note saying he had taken the child, according to authorities. The couple were not married.

Over the years, police investigated hundreds of possible sightings across the country. The break in the case didn’t come until the son started applying to college.

Some kind of problem was found with his Social Security number, and so he approached a school counselor, who discovered that

Mark Zuckerberg Becoming a father inspires me to make education better

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg thinks there’s no better time to help “unlock human potential” with his resources than now.

The fact that he and his wife, Priscilla Chan, are expecting their first child in part serves as inspiration for education-oriented philanthropic projects the couple is pursuing, according to a Facebook post Zuckerberg published Thursday.

CNN Money reported Zuckerberg also detailed a slew of new initiatives dealing with schools in the post.

This week Priscilla and I are spending time reflecting on some of the philanthropy work we’ve done recently and will do…

Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday, November 5, 2015

“Soon we’re going to be parents,” Zuckerberg’s post read. “And we care deeply about doing everything we can so all children — not just ours — can grow up and achieve their full potential.”

Zuckerberg and Chan put their goals in two categories: “unlocking human potential” and “promoting equality,” according to CNN Money. Long-term projects include funding new schools that promote “personalized learning” and giving money to existing school projects.

The couple’s education foundation, Startup:Education, shows ways Zuckerberg and Chan want to influence education in particular, Navindra Persaud wrote for Education World.

“Last year, the not-for-profit committed $120

State School Board recommends lawmakers end funding for Electronic High School

SALT LAKE CITY — Schools that use Utah’s Electronic High School, a public program that offers an alternative way for students to earn credit, may have to find another online provider to continue offering those services to students.

The Utah State Board of Education voted Friday to recommend that the Legislature not renew a yearly appropriation of roughly $1.1 million for the program to free up funding for other priorities, such as an additional $10 million for expanding full-day kindergarten and a $50 million classroom technology program.

“Always asking for new money and never looking for lower priorities than the money you’re asking for means that you oftentimes don’t get money for things that are a very high priority,” said State School Board Vice Chairwoman Jennifer Johnson. “We have a lot of things that we’re asking for for this office this year.”

Electronic High School is not a school as it doesn’t have the ability to graduate students. But the program does serve students in 35 districts and 53 charter schools by helping them take extra courses or retake courses they did not pass.

The program operates year-round from an annual appropriation from the Legislature and does so at relatively low cost, according to

You are college material Big push from educators starts this week

MURRAY — On a recent morning, a diverse group of nervous, yet excited students met in the counselling center at Cottonwood High School.

Collectively, they represented three continents and multiple languages, each student with their own story of how they and their families came to live in Utah, many of them as refugees.

But the students and their fellow seniors at Cottonwood High School will take a step together this month that they and their teachers hope will lead to personal fulfillment in life stories yet to be told.

It all starts with a college application.

Ivonn Celis, whose family came from Mexico five years ago, said she plans to study dental hygiene at either Salt Lake Community College or Utah Valley University.

“I’m excited to start learning more about my career and getting to where I want to be in life,” Celis said after submitting her applications. “I want to have a career for the future that I would know I would have a job wherever I go, but also because I want to be the second one to go to college in my family.”

Ngun Ceu hopes to be the first college graduate in his family, which arrived from Malaysia two years

Curriculum designed by the FBI draws criticism for inappropriately targeting Muslims

A curriculum designed by the FBI to detect the early stages of violent religious extremism has drawn fire from Islamic organizations, who argue that the curriculum inappropriately targets Muslims.

Details on the program were scarce in the New York Times article, but some of the learning tools included an exercise with paper and scissors, where students are led through “a series of games and tips intended to teach how to identify someone who may be falling prey to radical extremists,” urged to “not be a puppet” and asked to cut away strings that represent clues of extremist entanglement.

“They wanted teachers in social studies, civics and government classes to show this to their students,” Hoda Hawa, the director of policy and advocacy for the Muslim Public Affairs Council, told the New York Times.

“She and others interviewed were particularly troubled by a question that she said asked the user to identify which of four or five posts on social media should raise alarm,” the Times reported. “Among the choices were a person posting about a plan to attend a political event, or someone with an Arabic name posting about going on ‘a mission’ overseas. The correct answer was the posting with the Arabic

BYU football Missouri says team won’t return to practice until graduate student’s hunger strike ends

COLUMBIA, Mo. — Student protests over racial incidents on the University of Missouri campus escalated over the weekend when at least 30 black football players announced they will not participate in team activities until the school’s president is removed.

President Tim Wolfe gave no indication he has any intention of stepping down, but agreed in a statement Sunday that “change is needed” and said the university is working to draw up a plan by April to promote diversity and tolerance.

For months, black student groups have complained of racial slurs and other slights on the overwhelmingly white, 35,000-student campus. Their frustrations flared during the homecoming parade Oct. 10 when black protesters blocked Wolfe’s car and he would not get out and talk to them. They were removed by police.

On Saturday night, black members of the football team joined the outcry.

The athletes did not say explicitly whether they would boycott the team’s three remaining games this season. The Tigers’ next game is Saturday against BYU at Arrowhead Stadium, the home of the NFL’s Kansas City Chiefs, and canceling it could cost the school more than $1 million.

“The athletes of color on the University of Missouri football team truly believe ‘Injustice Anywhere

University of Missouri protests grow after athletes jump in

COLUMBIA, Mo. — Long-simmering protests at the University of Missouri over matters of race and discrimination got a boost over the weekend when at least 30 black football players announced they will not participate in team activities until the university system’s president is removed.

For months, black student groups have complained of racial slurs and other slights on the overwhelmingly white, 35,000-student flagship campus of the four-college system. Frustrations flared during a homecoming parade Oct. 10 when black protesters blocked system President Tim Wolfe’s car and he would not get out and talk to them. They were removed by police.

On Saturday night, black members of the football team joined the outcry. By Sunday, a campus sit-in had grown in size, graduate student groups planned walkouts, politicians began to weigh in, and a special meeting of the university system’s governing body was set for Monday morning in Columbia.

Wolfe hasn’t indicated he has any intention of stepping down, but agreed in a statement Sunday that “change is needed” and said the university is working to draw up a plan by April to promote diversity and tolerance.

The athletes did not say explicitly whether they would boycott the team’s three remaining games this

The Latest Missouri students head to class despite walkouts

COLUMBIA, Mo. — The latest on the protests and turmoil over racially charged incidents at the University of Missouri (all times local):

8:25 a.m.

Some University of Missouri undergraduate students are attending class despite two student groups calling for walkouts in solidarity with protesters who want the system president to resign.

Brendan Merz, a senior undergraduate heading to an economics class Monday, says the protests haven’t affected him at all. Merz says the protests are “a little excessive.”

The Steering Committee of the Forum on Graduate Rights and the Coalition of Graduate Workers called Sunday for walkouts of student workers out of support for protesters seeking the removal of President Tim Wolfe.

The group Concerned Student 1950 and black members of the football team are calling for Wolfe to step down over his handling of race and discrimination at the flagship school of the four-campus system.

1 a.m.

Members of the governing body of the University of Missouri system are set for a special meeting amid ongoing protests over matters of race and discrimination at the system’s flagship school.

The University of Missouri Board of Curators is to meet Monday at 10 a.m. on the system’s Columbia campus.

According to an agenda provided in a statement

workshop aims to help kids get ready for college

SANDY — What classes can help high school students prepare for college? Which skills will be needed in the workforce of tomorrow?

Parents of students in the Canyons School District will receive answers to these questions and more at two free workshops, offered in English and in Spanish, on Thursday, Nov. 12.

The free, evening workshops come as students gear up for Utah College Application Week, Nov. 16-20.

Tami Pyfer, education adviser to Gov. Gary R. Herbert and adjunct faculty at Utah State University, will discuss the importance of post-secondary education in the Board Room of the Canyons Support Services Center, 9361 S. 300 East, Sandy, from 7-8 p.m.

Karla Motta, academic bridge coordinator at the University of Utah’s College of Education, will lead a workshop on how to help your child prepare for college for Spanish-speaking families at the district’s Professional Development Center, 9361 S. 300 East, Sandy, from 7:30-8:30 p.m. Use the southeast entrance.

College Application Week encourages all high school seniors to fill out a viable college application, during the school day with help from counselors and volunteers. In efforts to remove barriers to college, the Canyons Education Foundation will provide up to $15,000 to cover college application fees for

STEM expo seeks to prepare high school students for ‘today and tomorrow

LAYTON — Wayne Young first heard about ARW Engineers, he said, at a Utah State University career night three years ago.

At the event, Young talked with the president of the Ogden-based structural consulting firm and decided it was the job he wanted. He later scored a professional engineering internship with the company.

Young’s role was reversed Monday at the Northern Utah STEM Career and College Exposition, as he was the one introducing ARW Engineers to students.

Young, 28, of North Ogden, said the event was likely more helpful for students than the one he attended because high schoolers have more time to network and decide their best career fit than he did as a college student.

“Personally, I don’t think it is too soon to start exposing students to career exploration,” said Neil Hancey, career and technical education curriculum supervisor for Davis School District. “To start with, they can get a little taste of everything, and in subsequent years they can start their own targets and their goals.”

The conference, involving 800 students from the Weber, Davis, Ogden and Morgan school districts, brought more than 60 educational and business institutions to the Davis Conference Center to introduce students to STEM (science, technology, engineering and